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IAGAS Director and colleagues’ paper on health ranked top

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Prof. Isaac Nyamongo, Director, IAGAS.

Prof. Isaac Nyamongo, Director, Institute of Anthropology, Gender and African Studies (IAGAS) and four other colleagues have jointly published a paper that was recently ranked among the 10 best resources on mixed methods research.

The paper by Njeru MK, Blystad A, Shayo EH, Nyamongo IK, and Fylkesnes K “Practicing provider-initiated HIV testing in high prevalence settings: consent concerns and missed preventive opportunities” was published in 2011.

The best resources were selected based on their importance to mixed methods research field (based on number of citations), comprehensiveness of the content provided by the authors, usefulness to readers and relevance to public health and health systems in resource-constrained countries.

An increasing number of researchers are turning to mixed methods research in order to research complex issues such as found in the area of health. Although qualitative research and quantitative research approaches are most widely used, mixed methods research provide an alternative methodological approach to conducting research. Mixed methods research is particularly useful in low- and middle-income country (LMIC) settings, where understanding social, economic and cultural contexts are critical in assessing health systems performance.

To provide researchers and programme managers with a guide and best resources to mixed methods research in health systems, Sachiko Ozawa and Krit Pongpirul reviewed the best resources with a focus on LMICs. They generated a list of the 10 best; eight peer-reviewed articles and two textbooks that describe the mixed methods approach. Their review article 10 best resources on … mixed methods research in health systems has been published in the journal Health Policy and Planning in the April 2013 issue. Health Policy and Planning is published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

About the publication by researchers based at the Institute of Anthropology, Gender and African Studies (Prof. Isaac K. Nyamongo) and at Centre for International Health, Bergen University (Mercy K. Njeru, Astrid Blystad, Elizabeth Shayo and Knut Fylkesnes, Ozawa and Pongpirul say that “At times logistical or financial hurdles may only allow for one phase of data collection. An example of a convergent parallel design is presented by Njeru et al. (2011) in the paper ‘Practicing provider-initiated HIV testing in high prevalence settings: consent concerns and missed preventive opportunities’. To examine the use of provider-initiated HIV testing services in Kenya, Tanzania and Zambia, the authors carried out a population-based survey along with focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. While the quantitative approaches examined the proportion of people utilizing HIV testing services, the qualitative approaches explored informants’ experiences and perceptions towards HIV testing services. Analysis from both approaches was interpreted and discussed concurrently, where authors relate the quantitative findings on exposure to HIV testing with quotes from qualitative analysis.” The paper ‘Practicing provider-initiated HIV testing in high prevalence settings: consent concerns and missed preventive opportunities’ (Njeru MK, Blystad A, Shayo EH, Nyamongo IK, Fylkesnes K, BMC Health Services Research 2011;11:87) is open access and may be freely downloaded by following this link http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3105945/

Sachiko Ozawa and Krit Pongpirul work at the Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA and Pongpirul has an additional affiliation to Chulalongkorn University, Thailand.

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